Pest Control Exterminator

Our extremely powerful 3000 volt electric fly swatter is the ultimate pest control exterminator.  One powerful zap with this bug zapper leaves no mess!

Pest control is the regulation or management of a species defined as a pest, a member of the animal kingdom that impacts adversely on human activities. The human response depends on the importance of the damage done, and will range from tolerance, through deterrence and management, to attempts to completely eradicate the pest. Pest control measures may be performed as part of an integrated pest management strategy.

In agriculture, pests are kept at bay by cultural, chemical and biological means. Ploughing and cultivation of the soil before sowing mitigate the pest burden and there is a modern trend to limit the use of pesticides as far as possible. This can be achieved by monitoring the crop, only applying insecticides when necessary, and by growing varieties and crops which are resistant to pests. Where possible, biological means are used, encouraging the natural enemies of the pests and introducing suitable predators or parasites.

In homes and urban environments, the pests are the rodents, birds, insects and other organisms that share the habitat with humans, and that feed on and spoil possessions. Control of these pests is attempted through exclusion, repulsion, physical removal or chemical means. Alternatively, various methods of biological control can be used including sterilisation programmes.

History

Pest control is at least as old as agriculture, as there has always been a need to keep crops free from pests. As long ago as 3000 BC in Egypt, cats were used to control pests of grain stores such as rodents. Ferrets were domesticated by 500 AD in Europe for use as mousers. Mongooses were introduced into homes to control rodents and snakes, probably by the ancient Egyptians.

The conventional approach was probably the first to be employed, since it is comparatively easy to destroy weeds by burning them or ploughing them under, and to kill larger competing herbivores. Techniques such as crop rotation, companion planting (also known as intercropping or mixed cropping), and the selective breeding of pest-resistant cultivars have a long history.

Red weaver ants, here feeding on a snail, have been used to control pests in China, Southeast Asia and Africa for many centuries.
Chemical pesticides were first used around 2500 BC, when the Sumerians used sulphur compounds as insecticides. Modern pest control was stimulated by the spread across the United States of the Colorado potato beetle. After much discussion, arsenical compounds were used to control the beetle and the predicted poisoning of the human population did not occur. This led the way to a widespread acceptance of insecticides across the continent. With the industrialisation and mechanization of agriculture in the 18th and 19th centuries, and the introduction of the insecticides pyrethrum and derris, chemical pest control became widespread. In the 20th century, the discovery of several synthetic insecticides, such as DDT, and herbicides boosted this development.

Biological control is first recorded around 300 AD in China, when colonies of weaver ants, Oecophylla smaragdina, were intentionally placed in citrus plantations to control beetles and caterpillars. Also in China, ducks were used in paddy fields to consume pests, as illustrated in ancient cave art. In 1762, an Indian mynah was brought to Mauritius to control locusts, and about the same time, citrus trees in Burma were connected by bamboos to allow ants to pass between them and help control caterpillars. In the 1880s, ladybirds were used in citrus plantations in California to control scale insects, and other biological control experiments followed. The introduction of DDT, a cheap and effective compound, put an effective stop to biological control experiments. By the 1960s, problems of resistance to chemicals and damage to the environment began to emerge, and biological control had a renaissance. Chemical pest control is still the predominant type of pest control today, although a renewed interest in traditional and biological pest control developed towards the end of the 20th century and continues to this day

Control methods

Biological pest control

Biological pest control is a method of controlling pests such as insects and mites by using other organisms. It relies on predation, parasitism, herbivory or other natural mechanisms, but typically also involves an active human management role. Classical biological control involves the introduction of natural enemies of the pest that are bred in the laboratory and released into the environment. An alternative approach is to augment the natural enemies that occur in a particular area by releasing more, either in small, repeated batches, or in a single large-scale release. Ideally, the released organism will breed and survive, and provide long-term control. Biological control can be an important component of an integrated pest management programme.

For example: mosquitoes are often controlled by putting Bt Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis, a bacterium that infects and kills mosquito larvae, in local water sources

Cultural control

Mechanical pest control is the use of hands-on techniques as well as simple equipment and devices, that provides a protective barrier between plants and insects. This is referred to as tillage and is one of the oldest methods of weed control as well as being useful for pest control; wireworms, the larvae of the common click beetle, are very destructive pests of newly ploughed grassland, and repeated cultivation exposes them to the birds and other predators that feed on them.

Crop rotation can help to control pests by depriving them of their host plants. It is a major tactic in the control of corn rootworm, and has reduced early season incidence of Colorado potato beetle by as much as 95%

Trap cropping

A trap crop is a crop of a plant that attracts pests, diverting them from nearby crops. Pests aggregated on the trap crop can be more easily controlled using pesticides or other methods. However, trap-cropping, on its own, has often failed to cost effectively reduce pest densities on large commercial scales, without the use of pesticides, possibly due to the pests’ ability to disperse back into the main field

Pesticides

Pesticides are applied to crops by agricultural aircraft, tractor-mounted crop sprayers, aerial spray by modern aircraft or as seed dressings to control pests. However, successful control by pesticides is not easy; the right formulation must be chosen, the timing is often critical, the method of application is important, adequate coverage and retention on the crop are necessary. The killing of natural enemies of the target pest should be minimized. This is particularly important in countries where there are natural reservoirs of pests and their enemies in the countryside surrounding plantation crops, and these co-exist in a delicate balance. Often in less-developed countries, the crops are well adapted to the local situation and no pesticides are needed. Where progressive farmers are using fertilizers to grow improved crop varieties, these are often more susceptible to pest damage, but the indiscriminate application of pesticides may be detrimental in the longer term.

The efficacy of chemical pesticides tends to diminish over time. This is because any organism that manages to survive the initial application will pass on its genes to its offspring and a resistant strain will be developed. In this way, some of the most serious pests have developed resistance and are no longer killed by pesticides that used to kill their ancestors. This necessitates higher concentrations of chemical, more frequent applications and a movement to more expensive formulations.

Pesticides are formulated to kill pests, but many have detrimental effects on non-target species; of particular concern is the damage done to honey-bees, solitary bees and other pollinating insects and in this regard, the time of day when the spray is applied can be important. The widely used neonicotinoids have been banned on flowering crops in some countries because of their effects on bees. Some pesticides may cause cancer and other health problems in humans, as well as being harmful to wildlife. There can be acute effects immediately after exposure or chronic effects after continuous low-level, or occasional exposure. Maximum residue limits for pesticides in foodstuffs and animal feed are set by many nations

Forestry

Forest pests present a significant problem because it is not easy to access the canopy and monitor pest populations. In addition, forestry pests such as bark beetles, kept under control by natural enemies in their native range, may be transported large distances in cut timber to places where they have no natural predators, enabling them to cause extensive economic damage. Pheromone traps have been used to monitor pest populations in the canopy. These release volatile chemicals that attract males. Pheromone traps can detect the arrival of pests or alert foresters to outbreaks. For example, the spruce budworm, a destructive pest of spruce and balsam fir, has been monitored using pheromone traps in Canadian forests for several decades. In some regions, such as New Brunswick, areas of forest are sprayed with pesticide to control the budworm population and prevent the damage caused during outbreaks

electric fly swatter

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Perfect for killing fleas on dogs and cats

Our electric fly zapper and swatter make it easy to get rid of all those pesky dog fleas that make your pet uncomfortable.  Simply run the insect zapper over your dog’s fur and watch it kill those biting fleas.

For Camping

Camping can now be enjoyable with our electric bug zapper.  Just wave our bug zapper between yourself and the insects to instantly zap them.

Electric Fly Swatter Features

4″ zap strip on the end of zapper designed to zap bugs along door frames, sliding in small hard to reach areas and ceiling corners.

Built in LED light to zap bugs and mosquitoes at night or in dark corners.

Bait tray attachment which you can set out pieces of meat or fruit to attract insects.

Included hand rope allowing you to hang the zapper and automatically zap bugs for as long as you like or to tie around hand for extra grip.

Protective screens on both sides of the electrode to protect you from accidentally shocking your fingers.

Safety drain down system, shutting power down within 10 seconds, so you dont get shocked after zapper is turned off.

On / off button.  Press the button to activate net / release button to de-activate net.  The red light indicates the net is “hot” (on).

Extremely lightweight

Takes 2 “D” batteries and gives off a 3000 volt charge

Our Electric Fly Swatter Kills the following insects on contact

Yellow Jackets
Hornets
Flies
Bed Bugs

Spiders
Fleas
Carpenter Bees
Wasps
Mosquitoes
Houseflies
Gnats
Black Bees
Centipedes
Horse Flies
Moths
Deer flies, and many more bugs and insects!

electric fly swatter

Get rid of pesky insects today!

Electric Fly Swatter Helpful Information

When an irritating insect is flying near you, just hit it, as you would a tennis ball.  There are dual large capacitors that hold 3000 volts of zapping power to kill insects but low amperage that allows alkaline batteries to power hundreds of hours of zapping time.

When a bee, hornet, horse fly etc. is buzzing back and forth near your body, put the zapper head near you, so the head is between you and the insect.  Swing out and away from your body.  If there are bees or flies hovering above your food, put the zapper head between the food and the bees and bring the head up quickly to zap them.

If the insect is in a horizontal corner between the ceiling and the wall, in a vertical corner where two walls meet, on a window, where it meets the frame or under an appliance or furniture, directly up on the ceiling or on the floor, just use the zapping area on the end of the head.  Move slowly until close then move the head quickly.  Slide the head lightly and quickly along the corners.

Mosquito Control Products

electric fly swatter

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This is a tool, not a toy.  Keep out of reach of children under 8 years old.

Use inside or outside in dry weather.

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